Ministry of Education, Guyana

Parenting Tips

pt-20130924-2Having a child go off to Nursery school is always marked by joy that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things; and marred by sadness that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things! The best way to ease the transition to school is by doing some “homework” of your own to make yourself and your little scholar ready for the first day of “BIG school”.

In this section, we will look at four (4) important areas where you can help yourself and your child be best prepared for nursery school and a lifetime of success. These areas are:

Ever wonder why so many cereals and infant formulas are fortified with iron? Iron is a nutrient that's needed to make hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells (RBCs). Red blood cells circulate throughout the body to deliver oxygen to all its cells. Without enough iron, the body can't make enough RBCs, and tissues and organs won't get the oxygen they need. So it's important for kids and teens to get enough iron in their daily diets.
Preparing Kids The arrival of a new baby can bring many changes to a family. Parents spend a lot of energy on preparations, and after the baby arrives, much of the family's attention involves meeting the newborn's basic needs. All this change can be hard for older siblings to handle. It's common for them to feel jealousy toward the newborn and to react to the upheaval by acting out.
It seems like just yesterday that you had to coax your daughter to bathe. But then she turned 11 and started spending hours in the bathroom and sizing herself up in every mirror she passes. She seems consumed by her looks. What happened? And is it healthy? As they approach the teen years, it's common and natural for kids to become more interested in appearances — their own and others' — seemingly all of a sudden. Their bodies are going through some big changes as they grow and go through puberty. As preteens change physically they become more aware of…
Seizures are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Someone having a seizure might collapse, shake uncontrollably, or have another brief disturbance in brain function, often with a loss of or change in consciousness. Seizures can be frightening, but most last only a few minutes, stop on their own, and are not life threatening.
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