Ministry of Education, Guyana

Parenting Tips

pt-20130924-2Having a child go off to Nursery school is always marked by joy that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things; and marred by sadness that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things! The best way to ease the transition to school is by doing some “homework” of your own to make yourself and your little scholar ready for the first day of “BIG school”.

In this section, we will look at four (4) important areas where you can help yourself and your child be best prepared for nursery school and a lifetime of success. These areas are:

Teach kids to reframe their thoughts by countering negative self-talk with self-talk that is both positive and realistic.
Emotions influence behavior. Part of growing up is learning how to manage our emotions and exercise self-control so that we can treat ourselves and others with respect. Sometimes that means resisting what we want to do in the moment (like throwing something when we’re mad) and making a more thoughtful choice instead. Two-year-olds can easily become overwhelmed by “big emotions” – including anger, fear and excitement. They often need our direct intervention to help them “cool down.”
Emotional self-awareness involves identifying and understanding one’s emotions – including “big feelings” that can sometimes overwhelm us. As Fred Rogers reminds us: “When we can talk about our feelings, they become less overwhelming, less upsetting, and less scary.” Two-year-olds can learn the names of core emotions: happy, sad, scared, and excited. Naming emotions empowers toddlers and helps them understand what’s going on inside their mind and body.
Grit involves sticking with something until you succeed. It’s another word for perseverance and resilience, and it gives us the strength to try, try, try again. Grit supports a “growth mindset” – a belief that our intelligence and skills can grow with effort. Kids with a growth mindset thrive on challenges and view failure as part of the learning process. For a five year old, grit might look like working on increasingly complex block structures, crafts, or puzzles; learning their letters and numbers, and remembering to use their words when they feel frustrated.
You are here: Home Parenting Tips