Ministry of Education, Guyana

Parenting Without Power Struggles

Three-year-old Ruby keeps upping the ante at bedtime. She says that if she doesn’t get one more book, or two more songs, or five more kisses (or all of the above!) that she simply won’t go to sleep. Voila — welcome to the pow·er strug·gle (noun), defined as: An unpleasant competition for power; refers to people in a relationship fighting about who is in control, with both trying to dominate the relationship in one way or another.

This stressful dynamic is not what most of us had in mind when we dreamed about having children, but it’s one almost all of us have dealt with. Power struggles are hard to avoid. Children can easily draw us into them. But it’s worth the effort to try to avoid this tug-of-war as it results in endless frustration. When a power struggle ensues, nobody wins.

Here’s how to avoid power struggles:

Seeking power is developmentally normal for kids. Young children are not doing anything wrong or misbehaving when they try to get their way or fight for what they want. It’s our job to guide them in acceptable ways to assert control. They can choose whether to brush their teeth before or after reading a book, but not whether to brush their teeth at all. They can choose to either eat all of their breakfast or take what they don’t finish in a to-go container, but they can’t eat one bite per minute to try to prolong mealtime to avoid going to school and make everyone in the family late.

You can’t control your child. You can’t make them do anything: eat, talk, pee in the potty, not call you names, not have a tantrum. Your job is to guide your children to make good choices and you do that by providing clear limits and boundaries that shape their behavior.

Young children thrive on clear limits and boundaries. Long, drawn out negotiations and inconsistent expectations cause confusion and can prevent children from making good choices. That’s why kids often do better at school or child care versus home. Group care providers run very tight ships in order to maintain a calm and safe environment. The rules and limits are crystal clear. There are no negotiations or “gray” areas. If they clean up their toys, they get to choose new ones. If they don’t put their coat and backpack in their cubby, they don’t get to be the line leader. Knowing exactly what to expect makes children feel secure. They know what to do to be successful. This teaches them to become strategic — to make good choices that serve them well.

Don’t judge a limit by your child’s reaction, aka don’t fear the tantrum. Just because your child doesn’t like a limit doesn’t mean it’s not good for her. The tantrum is just your child’s way of saying she doesn’t like your rule and is feeling frustrated or disappointed that she can’t have what she wants. Don’t expect a “thank you” for limiting your child’s sugar intake, screen time, etc.

Don’t react. Young children are highly skilled at tuning into what triggers their parents. While this feels exasperating, children are just trying to figure out how to gain the control they so desperately want and yet have so little of. Any reaction from you puts them in control and reinforces the behavior, even if your response is negative (which is naturally confounding to parents). The best way to respond? Ignore it. Behaviors that don’t get a reaction tend to decrease. This doesn’t mean you ignore your child. Instead, address the underlying feeling but don’t engage with the behavior. For example:

  • Child’s response to his dad who has just told him TV time is over: “I am going to take your voice box and throw it in the trash!” (True story).
  • Dad’s response: “I know you hate when the TV goes off. You love your shows. But that’s our family rule: one hour of TV. When you’re done being mad and are ready to read a book together, let me know.”

Impose limits that you can enforce and not ones that depend on your child’s cooperation. Any time you are trying to convince your child to do something, she is in control. For example, insisting that she stays in her bed at night or that she doesn’t get up from the dinner table before mealtime is over. But you can put up a gate to ensure she stays in her room and enforce a rule that leaving the table means her mealtime is over. Kids give up strategies that don’t result in their desired outcome.

Most importantly, have a plan for how you’ll respond to your child’s unacceptable demands. When you don’t have a system in place, that’s when things tend to fall apart. When you have a plan, it enables you to stay calm and loving while setting clear limits and avoiding power struggles.

Source:https://www.pbs.org/

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