Ministry of Education, Guyana

Parenting Tips

pt-20130924-2Having a child go off to Nursery school is always marked by joy that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things; and marred by sadness that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things! The best way to ease the transition to school is by doing some “homework” of your own to make yourself and your little scholar ready for the first day of “BIG school”.

In this section, we will look at four (4) important areas where you can help yourself and your child be best prepared for nursery school and a lifetime of success. These areas are:

Several years ago, while substituting in a kindergarten classroom, I forgot to add the “lunch” icon to the daily wall schedule. As the students filed in, two children burst into tears, convinced that lunch was canceled.
Courage involves making good choices in the face of fear or obstacles. It’s another term for bravery. Remember: Bravery doesn’t mean fearlessness. It means we do not let fear hold us back from exploring new opportunities, developing our skills, and doing what is right. For a seven-year-old, courage might look like reaching out to a peer who needs help, presenting in front of other people, or trying a new activity that stretches them.
One of the most powerful ways to develop your child's literacy skills is also the easiest: talk to your kids! At age seven, children begin to use language to explain both their outer world (what they see) and their inner world (what they think, feel and imagine). When they talk to caring adults, they can expand their vocabulary and learn more about the give-and-take of conversations — including taking turns and building on someone else's ideas.
When kids sit next to a caring adult and hear engaging stories, they develop positive associations with books. Reading aloud to your child strengthens the part of their brain associated with visual imagery, the ability to understand stories and word meaning. When you read to your five-year-old, they pick up on important book smarts, like how to hold a book, which direction to turn the pages, what an author is and where to find the title. These skills are called "concepts about print," and they help kids prepare to be successful independent readers.
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