Ministry of Education, Guyana

Parenting Tips

pt-20130924-2Having a child go off to Nursery school is always marked by joy that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things; and marred by sadness that your baby is growing up and going on to bigger and better things! The best way to ease the transition to school is by doing some “homework” of your own to make yourself and your little scholar ready for the first day of “BIG school”.

In this section, we will look at four (4) important areas where you can help yourself and your child be best prepared for nursery school and a lifetime of success. These areas are:

Your little one is growing up before your eyes and as he grows, you might think more about his future. Regardless of his career choice, you probably hope he’ll be a leader throughout his school years and into his adult life. In the article, "Raising Leaders: Developing Leadership Skills in Children," Dr. Steven Richfield explains that, "Leadership skills can make the difference between a child who thoughtlessly follows the arrogant will of the majority versus the trailblazer who obeys their own moral principles and sensible convictions." The qualities and skills of a leader are ones you can teach your child…
Chores are important for kids, since chores give kids a sense of purpose and a greater appreciate for their parents. It can teach your children responsibility and how to work with others to get a job done, according to Education.com. The values and skills your children gain from doing chores can follow them into adulthood and benefit them throughout their lives. This sounds great, but you need to know what chores are appropriate for each of your children, how to assign these chores and what it takes to get your kids to actually do them.
Teaching children to do chores will allow them to grow up knowing how to take care of themselves and the place they live. Kids benefit from having chores because it gives them responsibility. The key to teaching chores successfully is to start early. Children as young as 2 years old can help with basic chores, and their responsibilities should increase steadily from there.
Starting at an early age is the key to helping young children understand the difference between rights and privileges. Parents should revisit this discussion several times over the course of a child's development, as their needs and understanding will change with time and experience. Addressing the topic in a positive way can provide a great learning opportunity for other topics as well, such as allowance, chores and responsibilities.
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